Why Tiny Houses Can Save The Earth Infographic

Why tiny houses can save the earth

 

We are depleting our resources at a faster rate than we can replenish them and housing plays a very large role in this equation. During construction of the average sized house, nearly 7 logging trucks of wood products are used whereas in a tiny house, only about half of one logging truck is needed. The pollution associated with an average house is significant (about 28,000 pounds of CO2 emissions each year). In contrast, a tiny house only generates about 2,000 pounds. If we want to save our resources and slow down the rapid rate of CO2 emissions, we must rethink what size houses we live in. Living tiny can be done without compromise and many people have made the switch and are experiencing more joy, peace of mind, and sense of freedom than ever before. In this “Why tiny houses can save the earth infographic” we cover just some of the ways that tiny houses can help the environment.

Feel Free To Share this Image On Your Site

38 Responses to Why Tiny Houses Can Save The Earth Infographic

  1. Bob October 28, 2014 at 12:23 pm #

    Another great graphic showing the vast contrast between what so many people think is normal and what really is much more reasonable. Even small houses under 1200 sq ft use a lot fewer resources and energy, and have a lot lower emissions than the current average sized house.

    Maybe being nit-picky or a bit anal here. What is being said in the graphic where it is stated that a house has x number of light bulbs “generating” power? Shouldn’t that be that the x number of light bulbs “use” or “consume” power?

    • tah October 28, 2014 at 1:26 pm #

      Guess it depends on who “generated” the data, Bob.

    • Gabriella
      Gabriella October 29, 2014 at 12:32 pm #

      Great catch Bob! Made the change 🙂

  2. Dawn Zimmerman October 28, 2014 at 8:44 pm #

    I love tiny houses and I am all for the movement however I think the comparison may be a little unrealistic. I don’t know anyone that lives in a 2598 sf house or anything close to it. Where does this “average sized home” come from?

    • Gabriella
      Gabriella October 29, 2014 at 12:31 pm #

      Hi Dawn! I know, it seems crazy. That is the average house size based on various resources (NAHB, Census Bureau, etc.) Some of the averages are actually even higher than that. I chose the lower number of the sources I found.

      • bob October 29, 2014 at 4:03 pm #

        Do you mean that figure is too small? or too big?

        I think it really depends on the area where you live. The average size is from all houses in all areas across the country. In my town there are some houses under 800 sq ft, but the vast majority are bigger than 1800 sq ft. I currently live in a newer area, maybe only 30 years old for the oldest homes within 5 miles of me. My own neighborhood is only 15 years old. All the homes within 5 miles range from 1800 sq ft to over 7000 sq ft and most are closer to 2800-3500 sq ft. We bought our home when I was still fully under the influence of commercial consumerism and we thought we needed bigger. Well, we kept acquiring more stuff and needed someplace to store it. Now I would love to sell this monster and drastically downsize to something much much smaller than what we have. The kids are grown and gone and married now so this place is just way too big for 2 people. My wife isn’t there yet and desires staying, so for now we stay. Our current house is a ranch with walkout lower level and is 3380 sq ft total, not counting the garage but including the unfinished storage room. The finished space is just under 2700 sq ft with almost 1000 sq ft finished and 700 sq ft unfinished storage in the lower level. We have a monstrous storage room and it’s full of our stuff, my wife’s teaching supplies (which should all go away when she retires) and her mom’s stuff after she passed away a few years ago. I’ve downsized just my own stuff to the point where my clothes take up less than 10% of all clothing space used (she won’t let donate much of it even though I only use less than 1/3 of what I now have), and I’ve rid myself of over 75% of my accumulated stuff, much of which were in boxes I had not opened since moving into this house 15 years ago. They’re outa here now.

        • Dawn Zimmerman October 29, 2014 at 9:01 pm #

          Gabriella,

          Thanks for the reply! That is pretty wild. I wonder if the data was skewed at the high end… maybe a weighted mean would be more accurate if they didn’t already use one. Or maybe I just don’t know how to picture square footage in real life- that could very well be it. lol I guess I have gotten used to living in small dorm rooms, apartments and now a condo about half that average sf size. lol Thanks again. 🙂 I love these tiny house emails!

          Dawn

        • Dawn Zimmerman October 29, 2014 at 9:26 pm #

          Hey Bob,

          I meant too big. Sounds like a lot of newer houses by you. That’s awesome that you are down sizing your stuff. 🙂 I have been doing the same thing myself. We had a small storage area in the basement of the condo building that got full recently. We had to move some things out to get to the big stuff that we wanted to donate and then books and all that other stuff. When I first went down there to check it out I was shocked to find stuff up to the door. Although, our condo storage space is much smaller than one would have if owning a house, it still surprised me. lol My husband doesn’t have a problem getting rid of stuff, but he believes that if we were to buy a better house/condo/whatever, it would mean better neighborhood, nicer construction, and bigger. I would like to live in a tiny house, myself, and be able to move around a bit. lol

          Dawn

      • Dawn Zimmerman October 29, 2014 at 9:34 pm #

        Gabriella,

        I have learned so much by simplifying my surroundings in the past few months. It all started when I watched the video “Tiny: A story about living small” on netflix. Then I came across all kinds of Tiny houses online and a minimalist site that has been helpful in encouraging me to declutter and simplify my stuff and also my life. I have a ways to go, but I am on my way. 😉 My husband says no way to living in a tiny house so I don’t know if that will ever happen, but I am doing what I can. I have thought about writing a blog about my own experience, but I don’t really know a lot about that sort of thing. I have been writing down what I’ve been doing and learning and was just thinking that maybe my experience could encourage someone else who wants to live tiny, but like me, can’t do the tiny house thing. How would I get started with something like that? If I am stepping on your toes, I apologize profusely!

        Thanks!
        Dawn

        • Gabriella
          Gabriella October 30, 2014 at 5:11 pm #

          Dawn, would you be interested in writing an article for us here regarding your experience of wanting to live tiny but your husband not wanting to? We hear from many people in a similar situation and your experience may help others. If so, please shoot me an email. gabriella at tinyhousebuild.com

          • Dawn Zimmerman October 30, 2014 at 9:48 pm #

            Gabriella,

            I would love to! I just replied to your email. 🙂 Thank you for asking me!

            Dawn

    • Maria November 5, 2014 at 5:51 am #

      It also depends on the number of people living in those houses, the diference will be evidently less if they make an infographic comparing the quantity of resources used per person.

  3. Loi Phan February 23, 2016 at 1:11 pm #

    Hello, this is really good but it will perfect if you can compare the cost too 🙂

Leave a Reply

css.php